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Board Index Gear and Ammo Reloading

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For reloaders and related equipment such as presses, dies, trimmers, scales, and bullet molds.

Postby EBG » Thu Dec 17, 2009 4:20 am

Luckily, never had any primer explode while reloading. Most equipment I used was RCBS which I found both reasonably priced and reliable. Mine had a tube where you can insert approximately 30 primers wherein I never had to manually seat the primer by hand before punching it in the casing. I imagine one of the reason it would detonate is if it were not seated right. Another thing I can think of is if the seater is dirty, if casing is dirty (where the primer sits), or if the casing has been reloaded too many times already (too stretched or expanded where primer does not sit right anymore). One more thing - if you are going to cast your own lead, make sure you do it in a separate room or outside. Had a friend who had all equipment in one big room (including a pot of melting lead in one corner). He had a freak accident wherein his primer got knocked off the table and went all over the room with a couple jumping in the melting lead. He's alright but got pretty good burns from flying melted lead.
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Postby lrgcal4fun » Thu Dec 17, 2009 12:30 pm

Ouch! Flying molten lead doesn't sound like fun!



The reason I had trouble with the Lee Loader was poor manufacturing quality. The primer seating tool was left so ruff with tooling marks that it would dent the primer's face as it was seated. That tool was a real POS!
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Postby keyman » Thu Dec 17, 2009 12:39 pm

IF I were to get into it, there would be only three calibers that I would want to load. 45,9mm, and 380. Maybe that would save me a few dollars, especially on the 380. You guys are making it sound pretty tempting.



I took printing in high school, and have seen a mishap or two with the molten lead. But that was a loooong time ago.
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Postby judgeparker » Tue Dec 22, 2009 7:21 pm

I have been reloading since the early eighties the only thing I bought new was a Lee turret press and it has loaded thousands and thousands of rounds in 38/357, 9mm, 40S&W,45ACP, 30 carbine, well you get the point. I have never had a primer pop accidentally.You might pick up some used stuff at the gun shows, but I recommend that you buy new dies my first 38/357 dies were used and they scratched my cases . I like carbide dies best because you don't have to lube the cases. Like EBG said reloading can be fun and relaxing. The only problem I have with a new reloader is it means more competition for primers. Just kidding!! Get a good reloading manual like the one Speer puts out read up and jump in. Just remember do not deviate from the load data in the manual. Good luck.
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Postby EBG » Wed Dec 23, 2009 6:50 am

Oh yes - judgeparker is very right! Do not deviate from the load data. That's one tip I forgot to mention. Make sure your scale is zeroed out before weighing the powder & make sure there is no other forces that would alter the weight of the powder (like a fan). I had a .44 load that went ka-blam on the range instead of just boom. The load was too hot. Upon further investigation, I realized that I forgot to zero out my scale. Luckily I fired that .44 in a Desert Eagle (they are built like a tank!). I had to get a long screw driver and hammer, hit that casing a couple of times to knock it out the chamber.
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Postby Mark4 » Mon Jan 11, 2010 6:16 am

Buy a cross bow. ]:-)
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Postby aa0yy » Sun Jan 17, 2010 7:53 pm

I am considering reloading my own ammo. I have Nothing, no reload kit, no supplies, no books etc as of yet. Can I here some opinions on " a great way to get started" ? Brand names, reloading Bibles, etc.



Currently I am not a big shooter... by that I mean I dont go through allot of ammo, but that is largely due to it being cost prohibitive and with me being tight with a buck and all.



I dont want to buy something, then regret it because I cheapped out. I am frugal... not cheap ;-)



Thanks in advance for the advice,

Mark
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Postby lrgcal4fun » Sun Jan 17, 2010 9:01 pm

Hi aaOyy,



First, especially to keep from regretting your first buys, get a couple reloading manuals and read them over carefully. Hornady, Speer and Lyman are all great and I've used all three. Say away from the "Load Book" that focus on individual cartridges. The publisher seems to assume you know what you are doing and they don't publish much by away of instructions. Once you have some experience then they become a good resource.



Second, when you have a sense of what you want to start with look into getting starter kits: Hornady, RSBS and Lyman all make them. You can look all this stuff over at Midway http://www.midwayusa.com or Brownells http://www.brownells.com/



We will be happy to help answer your questions as you go along - there are several of us here that have reloaded for years.
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Postby judgeparker » Sun Jan 17, 2010 9:51 pm

Hello aa0yy any of the name brands such as RCBS, Lymon, Dillon, Hornady and Lee have beginner kits that will have everything you need to get started safely. Some brands require the purchase of expensive shell plates and other stuff for each caliber you reload and can cost a lot of money however they could possibly last two or three lifetimes. I chose the Lee turret press for several reasons quality, durability, afford ability. I found out all I needed for the lee turret besides dies was a $9.00 die holder and you don't have to have that you just change the dies in the one that came with the press. Cabelas has several kits at a decent price some even come with a reloading manual. If not I like the one Speer puts out but there are several good ones out there. Reloading for me is almost as much fun as shooting and very rewarding. Like I said in a previous post stick with data in the manuals have fun and be safe.
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Postby Mark4 » Sun Jan 17, 2010 11:37 pm

Dillon reloading package deals. Get the best you can afford and never load the old one at a time stuff.
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