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Board Index Gear and Ammo Reloading

New Category!

For reloaders and related equipment such as presses, dies, trimmers, scales, and bullet molds.

New Category!

Postby tigwelder56 » Sun Dec 13, 2009 9:25 pm

I encourage our members that are familiar with this art, to submit their thoughts and impressions of this most valuable ability. With prices the way they are, it would be a service for those of you that have the knowledge to share it with those who don't. We have to stick together!! Thanks to all for getting this started...
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Postby EBG » Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:25 am

I used to reload (not the progressive type, I reloaded the old fashioned one bullet at a time). Had to stop when I got sick and lost my fine motor skills. Anyway, if I can offer any tips feel free to ask. I used to reload .45 ACP, .44 auto, .357 magnum, .38 super, and .38 special. One tip I can give right now is if you find primers for .9 mm, .38, and .45 - buy it! My gun accessory supplier states that it's hard to find these primers for reloading at this time.
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Postby keyman » Mon Dec 14, 2009 3:31 pm

This is something that I know nothing about, but I read several gun magazines, and it sure does look tempting to try. I attend gun shows regularly, and it seems to me that by the time you pay for all the things necessary to reload, you might find the ammo at a cheaper price. Is that true or not ? ?
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Postby EBG » Mon Dec 14, 2009 9:22 pm

Reloading is like starting a small business, you don't reap the fruits of your labor unless you plan to do it for a long time. You initially buy everything and quite expensive when you start reloading but after you have all the basic equipment that's when the savings start. All you have to buy after is the primer, powder, and lead. You can reuse your brass or even pick up other peoples brass. Some even cast their own lead. If my calculations were accurate back then, it was only costing me 1/2 to 2/3 of the factory loaded ammo. Take note though, like tigwelder56 said - this is an art. There is a lot more to it than just slapping lead, powder, brass, and primer together. Example: just with the brass - if you reuse brass you have to resize, reshape, clean, and measure. If I had to write every detail needed to every part of a reloaded bullet, I would probably end up with a 50 page book. Speaking of books - you might gather enough information to start reloading from a book but there is nothing like learning details from an instructor. I first learned from an instructor then bought a book after (the book is more of a guide). All in all, reloading to me is fun, relaxing, and in the long run - money saving.
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Postby keyman » Mon Dec 14, 2009 10:01 pm

Thanks, EBG, I may get into reloading sometime in the future, but at present my ammo supply is pretty good. However, I go to the range every week, so no telling how long it will last. That is very interesting stuff . . . thanks for sharing it.
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Postby EBG » Tue Dec 15, 2009 4:32 am

Keyman, I use to go out to the range every week (sometimes even twice a week if I'm realy stressed) & with that kind of shooting - you will save money in the long run reloading. What you can probably do for now is start collecting your spent brass. Put them in ziplock bags and with a marker - write the caliber on the bag. This way, when you do get ready to reload, you'll be ahead with the brass & you won't have to buy them. If you decide not to reload at all, you can still make good use of the brass by selling them (yep, you heard right - people buy spent brass!!!). Take note though that some brass are non reloadable (like some of the Russian ammo).
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Postby keyman » Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:47 pm

I go to an indoor range, and there's plenty of spent cartridges to be picked up. However, I've never asked the managers if it is OK to do it. There's a ton of it there . . . just never thought to pick it up.



I think that getting started that way is a good idea. Not being completely committed to the task is a good way to start. If I were going to do it, though, I would probably jump in w/both feet. Those Dillon loaders are a good looking tool. Don't know about all the other stuff that is necessary get going.
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Postby tigwelder56 » Wed Dec 16, 2009 12:16 am

When I started and haven't for some time, I purchased the Lee Loader set up for .45acp. It was a one round at a time system, absolutely as manual a process as there is. EBG mentioned doing the same thing. I was able to load a boat load of ammo with that thing, still have some! The only thing I didn't like about it was setting the primers in place. I had more than one blow up in my fingers. Never got burned or hurt but I always kept an extra pair of shorts handy for those times when things got loud!!
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Postby keyman » Wed Dec 16, 2009 12:08 pm

That's a new twist for me, tig, I've never heard of anyone having that problem. All of my shooting buddies are probably thinking it would be a nice surprise for me.
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Postby lrgcal4fun » Wed Dec 16, 2009 6:32 pm

Hay, Thanks for the new category! Great idea!



When it come to getting started in reloading, I like to recommend the starter kits put out by RCBS and Lyman. They can be had from Midway and Brownell's and probably from Cabelas as well.



I also tried the "Lee Loader" (in 3006) and tossed it out. Very dangerous in my book. Like Tig, I had primers detonate during seating and was worried about the same happening when I seated the bullet on a loaded case.
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